EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE

The last decade, despite its bad news, has also seen an unparalleled burst of scientific studies of emotion. most dramatic are the glimpses of the brain at work, made possible by innovative methods such as new brain-imaging technologies. They have made visible for the first time in human history what has always been a source of deep mystery: exactly how this intricate mass of cells operates while we think and feel, imagine and dream. this flood of neurobiological data lets us understand more clearly than ever how the brain’s centers for emotion move us to rage or to tears, and how more ancient parts of the brain, which stir us to make war as well as love, are channeled for better or worse. This unprecedented clarity on the workings of emotions and their failings brings into focus some fresh remedies for our collective emotional crisis.I have had to wait till now before the scientific harvest was full enough to write this article/work. These insights are so late in coming largely because the place of feeling in mental life has been surprisingly slighted by research over the years, leaving the emotions as largely unexplored continent for scientific psychology. into this void has rushed a welter of self-help books, well-intentioned advice based at best on clinical opinion but lacking much, if any, scientific basis. now science is finally able to speak with authority to these urgent and perplexing questions of the psyche at its most irrational, to map with some precision the human heart. This mapping offers a challenge to those who subscribe to a narrow view of intelligence, arguing that IQ is a genetic given that cannot be changed by life experience, and that our destiny in life is largely fixed by these aptitudes. That argument ignores the more challenging question: what can we change that will help our children fare better in life? What factors are at play, for example, when people of high iq flounder and those of modest iq do surprisingly well? I would argue that the difference quite often lies in the abilities called here emotional intelligence, which include self-control, zeal and persistence, and the ability to motivate oneself. And these skills, as we shall see, can be taught to children, giving them a better chance to use whatever intellectual potential the genetic lottery may have given them. Beyond this possibility looms a pressing moral imperative. These are times when the fabric of society seems to unravel at ever-greater speed, when selfishness, violence, and a meanness of spirit seem to be rotting the goodness of our communal lives. Here the argument for the importance of emotional intelligence hinges on the link between sentiment, character, and moral instincts. There is growing evidence that fundamental ethical stances in life stem from underlying emotional capacities, for one, impulse is the medium of emotion; the seed of all impulse is a feeling bursting to express itself in action. Those who are at the mercy of impulse-who lack self-control-suffer a moral deficiency: the ability to control impulse is the base of will and character. By the same token, the root of altruism lies in empathy, the ability to read emotions in others; lacking a sense of another’s need or despair, there is no caring. And if there are any two moral stances that our times call for, they are precisely these, self-restraint and compassion. In this work i serve as a guide in a journey through these scientific insights into the emotions, a voyage aimed at bringing greater understanding to some of the most perplexing moments in our own lives and in the world around us. The journey’s end is to understand what it means-and how -to bring intelligence to emotion. This understanding itself can help to some degree; bringing cognizance tot he realm of feeling has an effect something like the impact of an observer at the quantum level in physics, altering what is being observed. All emotions are, in essence, impulses to act, the instant plans for handling life that evolution has instilled in us. the very root of the word emotion is motere, the latin verb “to move”, plus the prefix “e-” to connote “move away”, suggesting that a tendency to act is implicit in every emotion. That emotions lead to actions is most obvious in watching animals or children; it is only in “civilized” adults we so often find the great anomaly in the animal kingdom, emotions-root impulses to act-divorced from obvious reaction. In our emotional repertoire each emotion plays a unique role, as revealed by their distinctive biological signatures (see appendix a for details on “basic” emotions). With new methods to peer into the body and brain, researchers are discovering more physiological details of how each emotion prepares the body for a very different kind of response? * with anger blood flows to the hands, making it easier to grasp a weapon or strike at a foe; heart rate increases, and a rush of hormones such as adrenaline generates a pulse of energy strong enough for vigorous action. * with fear blood goes to the large skeletal muscles, such as in the legs, making it easier to flee-and making the face blanch as blood is shunted away from it (creating the feeling that the blood “runs cold”). At the same time, the body freezes, if only for a moment, perhaps allowing time to gauge whether hiding might be a better reaction. Circuits in the brain’s emotional centers trigger a flood of hormones that put the body on general alert, making it edgy and ready for action, and attention fixates on the threat at hand, the better to evaluate what response to make. * among the main biological changes in happiness is an increased activity in a brain center that inhibits negative feelings and fosters an increase in available energy, and a quieting of those that generate worrisome thought. But there is no particular shift in physiology save a quiescence, which makes the body recover more quickly from the biological arousal of upsetting emotions. This configuration offers the body a general rest, as well as readiness and enthusiasm for whatever task is at hand for striving toward a great variety of goals. * love, tender feelings, and sexual satisfaction entail parasympathetic arousal-the physiological opposite of the “fight -or-flight” mobilization shared by fear and anger. The parasympathetic pattern, dubbed the “relaxation response”, is a body wide set of reactions that generates a general state of calm and contentment, facilitating cooperation. * the lifting of the eyebrows in surprise allows the taking in of a larger visual sweep and also permits more light to strike the retina. This offers more information about the unexpected event, making it easier to figure out exactly what is going on and concoct the best plan for action. * around the world an expression of disgust looks the same, and sends the identical message: something is offensive in taste or smell, or metaphorically so. The facial expression of disgust-the upper lip curled to the side as the nose wrinkles slightly-suggests a primordial attempt, as darwin observed, to close the nostrils against a noxious odour or to spit out a poisonous food. * a main function for sadness is to help adjust to a significant loss, such as the death of someone close or a major disappointment. Sadness brings a drop in energy and enthusiasm for life’s activities, particularly diversions and pleasures, and, as it deepens and approaches depression, slows the body’s metabolism. This introspective withdrawal creates the opportunity to mourn a loss or frustrated hope, grasp its consequences for one’s life, and, as energy returns, plan new beginnings. This loss of energy may well have kept saddened-and vulnerable-early humans close to home, where they were safer. These biological propensities to act are shaped further by our life experience and our culture. for instance, universally the loss of a loved one elicits sadness and grief. But how we show our grieving-how emotions are displayed or held back for private moments-is molded by culture, as are which particular people in our lives fall into the category of “loved ones” to be mourned. The protracted period of evolution when these emotional responses were hammered into shape was certainly a harsher reality than most humans endured as a species after the dawn of recorded history. It was a time when few infants survived to childhood history. It was a time when few infants survived to childhood and few adults to thirty years, when predators could strike at any moment, when the vagaries of droughts and floods meant the difference between starvation and survival. But with the coming of agriculture and even the most rudimentary human societies, the odds for survival began to change dramatically. In the last ten thousand years, when these advances took hold throughout the world, the ferocious pressures that had held the human population in check eased steadily. Those same pressures had made our emotional responses so valuable for survival; as they waned, so did the goodness of fit of parts of our emotional repertoire. While in the ancient past a hair-trigger anger may have offered a crucial edge for survival, the availability of automatic weaponry to thirteen-year-olds has made it too often a disastrous reaction.

Attention Pl. – The information at any place in this website is just on an informative basis as well as to create awareness among the people regarding their health and ecourage to adopt ayurveda in their routine life. Hence no one ever should take it as a forgranted treatment as such for any disesase and is always advised to contact his/her physician before using it in any way

The material in this blog is not intended to be prescriptive or to be construed as either legal or medical advice. Data contained herein that may  pertain to disease or medical terminology is for descriptive purposes only and no “attempt to cure” is intended or implied. Advice relative to disease should be used in cooperation with a doctor or one who understand nutrition. It is not the intent of the author to diagnose or prescribe. The intent is only to offer health information to help you cooperate with your doctor in your quest for health. In the event you use this information without your doctor’s approval,  you are prescribing for yourself, which is your constitutional right, but   the author assume no responsibility

Attention Pl. – The information at any place in this website is just on an informative basis as well as to create awareness among the people regarding their health and ecourage to adopt ayurveda in their routine life. Hence no one ever should take it as a forgranted treatment as such for any disesase and is always advised to contact his/her physician before using it in any way

The material in this blog is not intended to be prescriptive or to be construed as either legal or medical advice. Data contained herein that may  pertain to disease or medical terminology is for descriptive purposes only and no “attempt to cure” is intended or implied. Advice relative to disease should be used in cooperation with a doctor or one who understand nutrition. It is not the intent of the author to diagnose or prescribe. The intent is only to offer health information to help you cooperate with your doctor in your quest for health. In the event you use this information without your doctor’s approval,  you are prescribing for yourself, which is your constitutional right, but   the author assume no responsibility

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3 thoughts on “EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE

  1. could you please give a detailed analysis of sadhaka pitta, the subdosha of the heart chakra that assists with emotional processing and intelligence.

    Thanking you in advance for your time and considerations, Jalanna Lloyd-Smith

    Like

  2. Hello There. I found your weblog the use of msn. This
    is an extremely smartly written article. I will be sure to bookmark it and return to learn more of your useful information. Thanks for the post.

    I will certainly return.

    Like

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